Sweet potato brownies by Nadine Dumas - Women's Heath and Fitness magazine

Ingredients (Serves 4 // Prep: 15 min // Cook: 35 min)

•    2 cups baked sweet potato (skin removed)
•    3 eggs
•    ¼ cup coconut oil (melted)
•    ¼ cup agave
•    ¼ tsp vanilla
•    3 tbsp coconut flour
•    4 tbsp cocoa powder
•    2 tsp cinnamon
•    ½ tsp fresh ground ginger
•    ¼ tsp pumpkin pie spice
•    ¼ tsp baking powder
•    Pinch sea salt
•    Chocolate chunks (as many as you’d like)

Method

1. Preheat oven to 220°C 

2. In a blender, add potato, egg, oil, agave, vanilla and blend until smooth

3. Add coconut flour, cocoa, cinnamon, ginger, spice, baking powder and salt and blend again.

4. Fold the chocolate in by hand. Bake in a 20×20 cm dish for 35 minutes.

5.Let sit for 30 minutes before serving.

SOURCE: WOMEN’S HEALTH & FITNESS MAGAZINE

baTarget Body Part:
Abs

Equipment Needed:
Stability Ball

 

Step 1

Starting Position:

Kneeling behind a stability ball, lean the body forward at a 45 degree angle and rest the elbows on the top of the ball. Keep the stomach muscles tight and the elbows pushing up from the ball directly under the shoulders.

Step 2

Move the ball around with the elbows drawing the letters of the alphabet. Maintain a straight line from head to knees.

SOURCE: AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EXERCISE

Ever wondered what “eating clean” or “going on a cleanse” really means?

Spend enough time talking about or searching for nutrition info online these days, and you’ll quickly notice that it seems like everyone is an expert. Between blogs, social media, online message boards, and good old-fashioned conversations with friends, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by competing opinions about what you should eat, how to eat it, and what to avoid. And all these opinions seem to be backed by some popular diet or book with a catchy title!

To make matters even more confusing, flying around in the middle of this dialogue are plenty of buzzwords that people toss around willy-nilly without fully understanding what they mean—if, in fact, they mean anything.

Well, it’s time to shoot some flies and clear the air. Before you start a new diet or dive into your next big nutrition conversation, learn the truth behind common nutrition buzzwords, and determine for yourself if they apply to your goals!

Buzzword 1: “Clean Eating”

Perhaps one of the most popular terms in the fitness and nutrition industry is “clean eating,” but what exactly does “clean” mean? Ask five people at your gym to define clean eating, and you’ll inevitably get five different responses.null

In most cases, clean eating refers to eating as much whole, unprocessed food as possible, while limiting the amount of processed foods in your diet. Rather than focusing efforts on the number of calories you consume in a day, the focus is shifted to consuming food items that meet certain requirements—only unprocessed foods that contain no artificial ingredients, or eating foods that have zero added sugar, for example.

Clean eating has evolved into a seemingly cryptic, pie-in-the-sky way of eating within the fitness community. It’s a diet of restriction that fails to honor personal food preferences, making it an unrealistic way of eating. While clean eating—as defined in this way—may work for a select few, educating yourself on healthier food options without placing restrictions on your diet is a much more realistic way of eating. Plus, leaving out certain processed foods such as milk and juices fortified with calcium and vitamin D  or Canned fruit (packed in water) and precut veggies—both of which are technically considered “processed” could cause you to miss out on important nutrients that keep your body in optimal health.

Buzzword 2: “Detox”

Next time you’re in the check-out line at the grocery store, take a look at the covers of popular fitness magazines. Chances are you’ll see some advertisement or article about a short-term detox cleanse, usually promising to miraculously bolster your health and wellness in a matter of days by “ridding your body of toxins.”

nullLet’s think about this for a minute. What toxins are folks who begin a detox diet trying to flush out of their system? Are there specific chemicals they’re trying to “clean out” by restricting themselves to a diet of tea and lemon water? The truth is, most individuals who go on a detox plan can’t seem to name what specific toxins they’re hoping to eradicate from their body in the first place.

Many cleanses and detox diets entail increasing fluids and limiting food choices to mostly fruits and vegetables. Since a detox diet typically involves calorie restriction, acute weight loss is often experienced. Additionally, an increase in fiber intake via increased fruit and vegetable consumption, coupled with the increase in fluids, may result in an increase in the frequency of your trips to the bathroom.

With that being said, the temporary weight loss individuals may experience after following a “detox diet” is mistaken as a perceived health benefit. It’s usually just the result of short-term calorie restriction, not fewer “toxins.”

In lieu of putting your body through all of this, shift your focus to making sustainable nutritious choices such as including more fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins into your diet so you can lose weight—and keep it off!—for the long haul.

Buzzword 3: “Low-Glycemic”

The glycemic index (GI) was originally developed for the treatment of diabetes. The GI ranks carbohydrate foods on a scale of 1-100 based on how quickly they affect blood sugar levels when consumed in isolation. Foods such as white potatoes and watermelon have a higher GI score, whereas slower-digesting carbohydrates like oatmeal and legumes have a lower GI score.

A common understanding in the fitness industry is that low-glycemic foods are “better” for you than high-glycemic foods because of the less dramatic insulin response. There are countless nutrition books and theories on controlling insulin response by only eating low-glycemic carbohydrate foods. Insulin has become one of the most feared hormones in the fitness industry.null

What most individuals don’t realize is that the glycemic index measures the insulin response of carbohydrates foods on a completely empty stomach in an isolated state. For example, white rice has a GI score of around 70. How often would you eat white rice, by itself, on an empty stomach? Pair that rice with a 4-ounce chicken breast and 1/2 cup green beans sautéed in a tablespoon of olive oil, and you drastically alter the entire glycemic response within that meal. For these reasons, the real-life application of the glycemic index is extremely limited.

Using the glycemic index to select which carbohydrate foods you chose to eat has limited practicality and application, which makes this a buzz phrase to watch out for. However, the glycemic index may be useful for individuals with diabetes, due to impairments in insulin production and metabolism.

Buzzword 4: “IIFYM”

IIFYM stands for “if it fits your macros,” an eating style that has gained a tremendous amount of attention over the past couple of years (thanks in large part to social media). IIFYM, also known as flexible dieting, is a buzz phrase that actually includes a great deal of practicality and sensibility—but it has to be applied appropriately.

Put simply, IIFYM is a system of tracking calories based on daily calorie, fat, protein, and carbohydrate targets. It allows you to take ownership of your daily food choices and overall dietary pattern and enables you to eat a diverse diet without restricting any specific foods.

nullWhen applied appropriately, IIFYM is a scientifically sound system of tracking your nutrition. Many folks, however, have mistaken IIFYM for an excuse to eat junk food such as donuts, pizza, and ice cream without any regard for nutrient density or food quality. Scan your social media feed and you will likely see your IIFYM friends sharing pictures of pies and ice cream with a hashtag endorsing IIFYM or flexible dieting. What you fail to see are the posts of fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, whole grains, and lean protein sources that probably make up the majority of those people’s diets.

The fact is, even if you follow IIFYM, you have to eat under a certain caloric target and meet your specific macro targets, so you don’t get a license to eat whatever you want all the time. You still have to follow a sort of 80/20 rule. In other words, 80 percent of your diet should be based on wholesome foods, while 20 percent of your diet could be used for favorite treats and indulgences.

Remember, the best diet to be on is one you can stay on, so IIFYM may be a great choice for you—but it’s not a free pass to eat whatever you want, despite what some people may have you believe on social media.

SOURCE: BODYBUILDING.COM

Image result for HIIT

High-intensity interval training (HIIT), which involves repeated bouts of high-intensity effort interspersed with recovery times, has become hugely popular in recent years. And for good reason: Research suggests HIIT improves both metabolic function and cardiorespiratory fitness, and requires considerably less workout time.

As a result, HIIT workouts can be found just about everywhere, from boutique fitness studios to large chain health clubs. The underlying principle of these workouts is nearly always the same: train hard, close to maximal capacity, rest a little, train hard, rest a little, repeat. Here’s what the research says about why HIIT is such an effective workout.

THE BENEFITS OF HIIT

IMPROVED CARDIORESPIRATORY FUNCTION

HIIT challenges the body to perform at the upper end of the aerobic training zone, which is called the second lactate threshold. When training at this end of the aerobic training zone, there is shift from using aerobic metabolism to anaerobic metabolism to produce energy to fuel the activity.  Training at this intensity improves cardiorespiratory function during exercise and at rest, and the body shifts from using aerobic metabolism to anaerobic mechanism to produce energy and generate force. In fact, HIIT training has been shown to benefit just about everyone, from endurance and strength athletes to recreational exercisers. That’s because it’s adaptable, meaning it can be used for aerobic training as well as muscular strength training, or a combination of the two.

EXCESS POST-EXERCISE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION

HIIT also increases caloric burn after an exercise bout through a process known as excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, or EPOC. Essentially, the body must consume more oxygen, which increases the amount of calories that are being burned, to return to its pre-exercising state after an intense bout of exercise. Therefore, by incorporating HIIT training into a workout regiment, body composition may improve as a result of the greater caloric burn associated with HIIT training. However, it is important to note that body composition is not altered by exercise alone; nutrition plays a key role in optimizing one’s fat-mass-to-lean-mass ratio.

SHORTER WORKOUTS

When it comes to workout efficiency, HIIT is especially attractive in that it does not require a large amount of time to reap the benefits. HIIT workouts typically last 20-30 minutes and are extremely effective as long as the intensity level is high. From both a psychological and physiological perspective, it is easier to maintain a high level intensity for a brief period of time than it is over a longer period of time, greater than 30 minutes.

With a growing body of research demonstrating that HIIT can be an effective and efficient way to exercise, this high-intensity workout is likely to remain popular for many years to come.